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Reasons Why You Should Have A Will

Providing peace of mind

Your Last Will & Testament is not something you can afford to leave to chance. So, we strongly advise anyone who has not already drawn up their will to consider this a priority. 

It is a sad fact that only three out of every ten people in the UK have a legally binding will. Last year the Treasury gained some £53m from people who died intestate - without a will. The year before that figure was £76m, so in the absence of a will the inheritance you worked so hard to leave for your family will go instead to government coffers. 

If you engage the services of a solicitor to draft a will the cost can vary between £85.00 and £250.00. It could also cost you far more if your will proves to be complex - solicitors tend to bill per hour of their time. 

As a customer of The Last Letter you will also receive a free legal "will kit", and all of the necessary advice on completing that document. If you require assistance on either the Last Letter programme or the free DIY will pack, please do contact us and a senior team member will be happy to answer any questions you might have. 

The language of wills can be confusing, and although there are some strict rules to be adhered to, we have set out to make that process as simple and painless as possible for you. 

We offer what is termed a Simple Will process, where there are no complicated trusts or tax avoiding inflections.  For example, you may decide to leave everything to your wife/husband, and also list some specific items for your children or other beneficiaries.

Another possibility is that of a Mirror Will, where one will is in the name of the husband and the other in that of the wife. Each will reflects the same requirements, making it a Mirror Will. 

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Click on the links below to download our Free Advice on the main aspects of the Will process, the legalities and other requirements. 

There are four documents, and the advice is written in plain English with no legal jargon or ambiguity to confuse or mislead you.

What Makes a Will Legal

General Advice

Intestacy

Executing

 

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